Best Headphones For Guitar Amp (2021 Guide)

As much as you like practicing with your guitar, some of your neighbors may be irritated by the chords blasting through the amp. To prevent nasty stares and endless complaints, getting a headphone that fits your guitar amp is the best solution.

Besides preventing the guitar sound from escaping your room, listening through the headphone gives you better clarity on every single note or chords that are emitted from it. With better feedback, you get to improve your techniques.

Playing the guitar with a headphone also allows you to have a better idea of how the tune sounds like if you plan on recording it with a console.

However, there are many confusions on pairing the right headphone with the guitar amp. Should you worry about impedance? Do you need an open back or closed back?

You’ll find out more as in this guitar headphone buying guide.

Headphones For Guitar Amp Compared

Choosing The Right Headphone For Guitar Amp

You could be burning your hard-earned money if you’re grabbing the cheapest piece of headphones on the market. Headphones that work well for you when watching Netflix may not produce the desired sound quality for a guitar amp.

You could be burning your hard-earned money if you’re grabbing the cheapest piece of headphones on the market. Headphones that work well for you when watching Netflix may not produce the desired sound quality for a guitar amp.

Some low-impedance headphones may even blow out if it couldn’t take on the power delivered by the amp. Before you choose a guitar headphone, you ought to consider the following factors.

Impedance

The impedance of the headphone refers to the resistive properties of the speaker driver electronics. Generally, the lower the resistance, the easier it picks up the sound from an audio source. Most earbuds that are used with mobile phones have 8-ohm drivers, which are considered low impedance.

If you plug in low-impedance drivers to an amplifier, you risk damaging the headphone. An amplifier is contained circuits that enhance the audio in terms of amplitude. In an electrical sense, the power delivered at the output is considerably greater than a mobile phone or laptop audio.

As such, you’ll need to choose a headphone with an impedance that matches the guitar amp you’re using. Usually, 32-ohm headphones will have no issues when plugged into a guitar amp. Some higher-ends studio headphone has higher impedance due to the circuitry of the drivers.

Frequency Range

The frequency range refers to the frequencies that a headphone is capable to produce. Naturally, the minimum requirement for a good headphone is to meet the range of human auditory capability.

Our ears are able to pick up sounds between 20 Hz to 20,000 Hz. This is the minimum figure that a guitar headphone must comply with. Some headphones are rated with a wider range of frequencies, such as 5 Hz to 30,000 Hz.

As the human’s audio range is limited, you can’t pick up the sound that goes beyond the normal limit. However, a headphone with an extended frequency range usually offers better bass and treble quality at the end of the spectrum.

The reason is that the filters used in the electronics do not chop off the frequency at the exact point. If the headphone is has a lower limit of 20 Hz, sounds at 50 Hz or 100 Hz may not be produced with the same amplitude with those in 5 kHz. Therefore, getting a headphone with a wider range of frequency will result in a more accurate response at our hearing limits.

Avoid headphones with anything less than 20 Hz to 20 kHz.

Sound Isolation

Sound isolation works both ways for guitar headphones. Closed back headphones are popular as they greatly reduce background noise from affecting the audio. If you’re constantly disturbed by roaring car engines, a closed-back will help.

Some people opt for an open back headphone as it allows a more natural soundstage. This will be a good pick if you’re practicing alone. Open-back also means that your ear will be less sweaty as there’s ventilation for air to flow.

However, if you’re practicing in a common room with other people, an open back headphone may backfire. It lacks sound isolation and you may risk annoying others as the guitar sound escaped through the open back drivers.

Comfort And Durability

If you’re going to be playing the guitar for hours, you’ll need a headphone that’s designed for comfort. This means earcups with soft cushion padding and headbands that firmly secure the headphone without applying excessive pressure.

 It’ll be pointless to get a headphone that will be a source of distraction for your practice or recording session.  Adjustable headbands and swiveling earcups are features that increase the comfort level of a headphone.

Flimsy headphones must be avoided at all costs. Even if you’re not headbanging when on the guitar, you’ll need to get a headphone that will last for prolonged usage. Check out for complaints of cracked headbands for red flags of a sub-par headphone.

Price

Pricier options aren’t always better as far as guitar headphones are concerned. High-end headphones usually command higher prices as they boast better drivers and higher impedance. However, you shouldn’t assume that a pricier headphone is the right fit for you.

Consider your affordability and whether it’s worthwhile to go for a top-of-the-range headphone. Sometimes, a professional headphone with a modest price can offer decent sound quality that’s suitable for practicing or monitoring.

Other Features

Manufacturers are constantly improving their offerings of headphones, and this often comes in the form of added features. Some headphones have a detachable cord, which is handy for storage or in case you need to replace a faulty cord.

Some headphones not only work well for guitar amps but are also ideal for regular use on a PC or music player. Often, you’ll have cords with 6.3mm and 3.5 mm bundled with the headphone to cater to the different types of jacks on the amps and other devices.

Best Headphones For Guitar Amp 2020

1. OneOdio Pro-30

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The OneOdio Pro-30 has a stylish design that goes well with an equally classy guitar you owned. Beyond the outstanding look is a headphone that is geared for professional studio monitoring. With its 50mm neodymium drivers, you get to experience deep and powerful bass along with the higher tones in perfect clarity.

This 32-ohm headphone works not only with ordinary devices like laptop, but also produces great sound when plugged into a guitar amp. You’ll find that it has a detachable cord and two different cords with 6.3 mm and 3.5 mm are supplied with the headphone. To turn it into a guitar headphone, the 6.3 mm cord will be handy.

You’ll also enjoy the comfort that the team has incorporated with care. While the form of the headphone is made with matte plastic with glossy finishes, the earcups and the underside of the band are cushion-padded for comfort. Thanks to the breathability of the material, you’ll be practicing for hours without having ear fatigue.

There’s so much value built into the OneOdio headphone. At an affordable price, you’ll have a versatile headphone that goes beyond guitar practice. Also, cable tends to wear out in the long run and having detachable ones means you just need to replace the cord.

Pros

  • Detachable cord.
  • Swiveling earcups.
  • Dynamic bass and clear higher tones.

Cons

  • Durability may be an issue.

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2. Sony MDR7506 Large Diaphram Headphone

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After hitting the market since the early 90s, the Sony MDR7506 remain a popular option for professionals. Its 40 mm drivers never failed to deliver balanced tones across the sound spectrum. This means you won’t have overly-heavy bass but instead a more regulated response across its range of 10 Hz to 20 kHz.

Generally, the Sony MDR7506 is a great studio headphone for recording and practice. Its 63-ohm drivers will respond well with the amp output. There isn’t any hint of sound leakage with the headphone. However, it isn’t the best in blocking noise from the surrounding.

With a 9.8 ft coiled cord, you’ll have more than the distance you need when hooking it up to the guitar amp. The cord terminates with a 3.5 mm plug but it has an accompanying 6.3 mm adapter that will work for the amp. The OFC gold plugs contribute to the sound stability delivered by the driver.

Sony took great effort to ensure the headphone is optimized for both comfort and portability. Although it’s a closed-back design, the soft padding ensures you’ll remain comfortable even after long hours of usage. Once you’re done practicing, you can fold the headphone into half and store it away in a pouch.

Pros

  • Well balanced across bass, middle and treble.
  • Comfortable earcup paddings.
  • Great for studio recording.

Cons

  • Sound isolation is not great.

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3. Philips SHP9500 Open Back Headphone


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If you’re practicing guitar in a private setting, you can enjoy the spatial sound provided by the Philips SHP9500. It’s an open-back headphone that allows more space to the sound, ensuring a more natural listening experience.

With an extended frequency range of 15 Hz to 35 kHz, each note belted out from the guitar will be reproduced with equal clarity. You’ll get to listen to your guitar in a balanced spectrum across the bass, middle and higher treble. Thanks to the open-back design, you’ll get a less-restricted treble, particularly at the higher frequencies.

The headphone boasts an extra-large pair of 50 mm drivers, which are made neodymium magnets. Philips got innovative with the driver as it’s shaped to angle the audio to suit the ear’s contour. The move paid off as you’re rewarded with a subtle, yet more natural audio experience.

If you’re practicing or recording with the guitar amp for a long period, the headphone’s breathable cushion will provide long-lasting comfort. It’s also made to last as the headband is constructed with premium steel material.

As the headphone is built to support a removable cord, replacing one is as easy as ordering a new one. The cord has a 3.5 mm plug which can be connected with a 6.3 mm adapter to fit guitar amps.

Pros

  • Extra large 50 mm drives.
  • Detachable cords.
  • Polished metal headband.

Cons

  • Occasional issues with audio quality.

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4. Audio-Technica ATH-M50x

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Audio-Technica is no stranger to professionals in the sound industry. The ATH-M50X is a great over-ear headphone for studio monitoring. It’s only natural that it’ll do an equally great job for your guitar amp.

The headphone is equipped with a pair of unique 45 mm drivers that are made of rare earth magnets and copper-aluminum coils. Due to its unique design, the headphone has no problem in producing exceptionally powerful accurate bass and clear treble. The pretty flat frequency response makes the ATH-M50X ideal for monitoring.

You’ll find that both high and low notes are presented in clear audio, thanks to its extended frequency that ranges from 15 Hz to 25 kHz. Once you’ve put it on, you’ll be oblivious to its presence when engrossed in playing the guitar. That’s because the contoured padding ensures you feel nothing but softness.

The ATH-50X features swiveling earcups, which makes it easy to fit securely on your ear. The earcups can be folded inward and the cord removed for hassle-free storage. You’ll get a coiled and straight cable with an order of the highly-rated headphone.

Pros

  • Flat frequency response for monitoring.
  • Swiveling earcups.
  • Great sound isolation.

Cons

  • Not for casual listening.

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5. AKG 240 STUDIO

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Sometimes, sticking with what’s proven to work is the best for a guitar headphone. The AKG 240 series has been in the industry since the 70s and this headphone retains all the proven features of its predecessor.

The AKG 240 Studio features a lower impedance driver with the patented Varimotion diaphragm. With its brand new 55-ohm drivers, the headphone produces louder sound on amplifiers and other professional gadgets. You don’t get overwhelming bass on the headphone, but a rather softer response in comparison to other bass-heavy headphones.

If you enjoy listening to your guitaring with the soundstage effect, the AKG 240 Studio doesn’t disappoint. Its partial open-back design gives just enough space for the tune to dance around. But this also means that noise-isolation isn’t a forte with the partly exposed drivers.

The comfort level is also at its max with the AKG 240 studio. The padded earcups coupled with the rugged yet flexible headband, ensure the headphone fits properly on the wearer without excessive pressure. Not only you won’t feel constrained, the ultralight design of the headphone means you’re able to use it for long hours.

Thanks to the detachable cord, you’re able to replace it easily if it eventually wears out. Made of oxygen-free-copper, the cord is terminated with a gold plated 3.5 mm jack. To connect to an amp output, you’ll need to screw the cord into a 6.3 mm adapter which is included with the headphone.

Pros

  • Proprietary sound transducer with a balanced frequency response.
  • Gentle soundstage effect.
  • Comfortable for long hours.

Cons

  • No sound isolation.

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6. Sennheiser HD280 Pro

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The Sennheiser HD280 Pro has a new makeover and the changes made resulted in a better listening experience. What’s noticeable is the obvious newer padding on the earcups. The new paddings are extremely comfortable and a step above of its predecessor.

That’s not to say that the old HD280 Pro isn’t a great headphone. It’s just that the newer version is considerably better. The new HD280 Pro inherits the exceptional sound quality of the old version. You have just the right balance of sound across the 8Hz – 25 kHz spectrum. The bass isn’t exceptionally loud and the treble is just the right tone for a monitoring headphone.

If you’re wearing the headphone for lengthy period when performing with the guitar, you’ll find that the noise-isolation is arguably one of the best amongst headphones without ANC. The thick and well-positioned padding greatly reduces background noise. Also, the headband produces a firm gripping force on the ear to keep the noise out and keep the headphone secure. Any discomfort is dispelled by the thick cushion padding on the earcups.

You’re also in for a surprise with the HD280 Pro. As a closed-back headphone, you wouldn’t expect a soundstage effect, but not with this headphone. Thanks to the ingenuity in its design, you’ll experience natural soundstage that you won’t get in typical closed back headphones

Pros

  • Flat frequency response for studio monitoring.
  • Blocks noise off and firm when fitted.
  • Natural sound stage effect.

Cons

  • The headband may be too tight for some people.

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7. Fostex T50RP MK3

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Studio engineers will be familiar with Fostex and the T50RP MK3 is an iteration that betters its predecessor. The semi-open headphone spots a couple of drivers that are capable of taking in up to 3,000 mW of audio input. These 50-ohm drivers will work fine with your guitar amp.

With an extended frequency of 15 Hz to 35 kHz, the headphone aims to delight your ear with clearly audible tones across the spectrum. If you’re expecting a bassy tone, you’ll be disappointed. As a studio headphone, Fostex does a great job of keeping the tone strictly to the original source.

There’s nothing fancy with the build of the headphone, as Fostex stick to practicality with the T50RP MK3. The earcups have an adjustable hinge that can be slide up or down to fit the head circumference of the listener. With the semi-open ear cups, you’ll have better breathability along with more rooms for the sound to bounce.

Overall, this headphone is a good buy if you’re practicing or recording a guitar at home. The 6.3mm plug on the cord goes straight into your amp. However, there are some comments that the pads may cause some discomfort for prolonged usage.

Pros

  • Great sound quality with extended frequency.
  • Balanced and accurate frequency response for monitoring.
  • Sound stage effect with semi-open back.

Cons

  • The earcups pad may be uncomfortable.

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8. Beyerdynamic DT 990 Pro – 250 Ohm

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Beyerdynamic is famed for its open back studio-quality headphones and the DT990 Pro is a force to be reckoned with. The model itself comes with 2 types of impedance, namely 80 Ohm and 250 Ohm. Both versions will produce great quality audio but if you’re fussy about clarity, the 250 Ohm version is the answer.

As any Beyerdynamic headphone will testify, the sound spectrum produced by its drivers isn’t a flat range, but rather exhibiting some unbalanced on the highs and lows frequency. You can expect some distortion on the lower bass while the higher treble tends to be slightly choppy. Chances are, you may not notice the imbalance as it’s not really obvious.

In terms of design, the DT 900 Pro is as classic as any Beyerdynamic headphones. Metal headband with plastic open enclosures for the drivers ensures the headphone will likely to survive a fall. The velour-pads on the earcups make you comfortable when you’re playing the guitar.

Also, you’ll have a very pronounced sound stage effect from the openings at the earcups. This also means that the headphone is only suitable when you’re practicing the guitar alone. The headphone is fitted with a considerably long cord. Measuring 3 meters and with a 6.3mm plug, connecting it to the amplifier is not an issue.

Pros

  • Great sound stage effect.
  • Impressive sound quality.
  • Comfortable and sturdy.

Cons

  • Curvy frequency response at lower bass and higher trebles.

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9. Status Audio CB-1

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The Status Audio CB-1 is strictly a headphone that’s meant for studio monitoring. When plugged into a guitar amp, it reveals the tune that you’ve played without adding any nuances to it. This means all your hits and misses will be obvious to your ears.

Technically, the headphone produces a rather flat response across the wide 10Hz to 30 kHz frequency range. Armed with a pair of 50-mm 32 ohm drivers, the headphone produces neutral tones that are required for monitoring.

Everything about the CB-1 shouts generic. From its flat frequency response to a rather bland design, the headphone is about keeping things simple. Beyond the minimalist design, you’ll have comfort detailed in the soft padded cushion around the earcups. It makes wearing the headphone bearable even if you’re on the guitar for hours.

Besides comfort, the oversized cushion also did a great job in sound isolation. You’ll find that external noise is greatly reduced and no sound leakage from the earcups. The headband is also made of firm materials, which reduces the risk of cracking even if it’s bent.

The headphone features a jack for the detachable cords. You’ll be supplied with two cords, one coiled and another a straight cable. Both are terminated with 3.5 mm plugs. However, you can use the supplied 6.3 mm adapter to fit the amp that you’re using.

Pros

  • Flat frequency response for monitoring.
  • Great sound isolation with no leakage.
  • Detachable cord.

Cons

  • The headband may break if excessive force is applied.

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10. Beyerdynamic DT770 250 Ohm

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If you’re looking for a Beyerdynamic headphone without the open-back design, you’ll need to opt for the DT770 model. As part of the brand’s uniqueness, the model is available in a few impedance ratings. The 250-ohm version will go well with most guitar amps and produce crystal clear sound.

With the closed-back earcups, the DT770 produces a more confined sound. It’s also less prone to noise, as the drivers are fully blocked from the exterior. As a headphone that works perfectly for monitoring, the sound quality is rather flat. It lacks the added emphasis on bass, which is common in casual headphones.

You won’t feel strained when putting on the headphone. The velour pads on the earcups ensure that the pressure delivered by the headband is absorbed. Furthermore, the headband is made of robust spring still, which allows a certain degree of flexibility

If you’re getting the 250-ohm version of DT770, the headphone is fitted with a 3 m coiled cable with a 3.5 mm plug. If your amp requires a 6.3 mm plug, you’ll find the adapter that ships along with it.

Just like the DT990, the frequency response of the headphone isn’t a flat line. Instead, you’ll get a softer bass and an overstretched treble at both extremes of the frequencies.

Pros

  • Good noise isolation.
  • Crystal clear sound quality.
  • Velour pads on earcups ensure comfort.

Cons

  • Defects in some units.

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11. Yamaha HPH-MT5

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For a relatively low budget professional headphone, the Yamaha HPH-MT5 certainly delivers. Famed for its range of audio products, Yamaha ensures that the MT5 produces more than satisfactory sound quality that will satisfy most guitarists.

While it’s been billed as a monitoring headphone, the audio delivered isn’t all flat on the frequency spectrum. Ranging from 20 Hz to 20kHz, both drivers are a little heavy on bass while the mids and uppers are more audible than usual. If you’re hoping for extra emphasis on those tunes you belted out on the guitar, the HPH-MT5 is a great choice.

Unlike most high impedance headphones, the Yamaha HPH-MT5 works fine on home computers, laptops or other consumer audio players. The audio is clearly played out on its 51-ohm drivers. This itself is remarkable considering the lower price point the headphone is marketed.

As a considerably affordable professional headphone, you’re in for a pretty good sound stage. Besides that, Yamaha has managed to ensure good sound isolation when you put on the headphone. You’ll barely feel any burden on your head as the HPH-MT5 is made of lightweight materials.

Lightweight does not equal fragile, at least not for the MT5. The headphone is reasonably tough, especially the cord that comes with it. The sturdy cord prevents accidentally ripping it off or damaging the cable from rough usage. The MT5 also ships with a 6.3 mm adapter that goes right into its 3.5 mm plug on the cable.

Pros

  • Good sound accuracy.
  • Budget-friendly.
  • Comfortable for long hours

Cons

  • Bass is a little on the heavy side.

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12. Samson SR850

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If you’re really tight on a budget, you could consider the Samson SR850. It’s probably the cheapest studio headphone around and with open back design. At first glance, it seems to be a bland looking headphone with nothing to shout about in terms of design. You could also be suspicious of the build quality.

However, the SR850 is a considerably decent headphone that offers some pleasant surprises for its price tag. For a start, it lives up to its promises as a studio monitor headphone. With a rather flat frequency response, you’ll have the audio played out the sound from the guitar amp without any tone coloring.

Being an open back headphone, you’ll also get the desired sound stage effect that works well when you’re on the guitar. As expected, sound isolation is non-existence and leakage is noticeable. Not the type of headphone you’ll want to use in a crowd.

There are obviously rooms for improvement in terms of comfort for the Samson SR850. The headband can do with extra thickness, particularly if you have a habit of dropping the headphone. The earpads may feel stiff for some people and if you’re using it for long hours, you may want to get better replacements that offer more comfort.

It’s not all roses and glory for the SR850, but for such a budget-friendly price and a monitor-grade sound quality, you can’t complain much.

Pros

  • Budget-friendly
  • Flat frequency response for monitoring.
  • Adjustable earcups.

Cons

  • Can be uncomfortable.

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13. Shure SRH440

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With a neutral response, the Shure SRH440 is a decent guitar headphone for recording and monitoring. Its frequency response is almost a flat curve, with barely noticeable deviation with the top and bottom limits. The headphone covers a wide range of spectrum from 10 Hz to 22 kHz.

There isn’t any overpowering bass when you’re listening from a guitar amp. But there can be some slightly off-limit range in the higher treble. The slight deviation aside, Shure SRH440 closed back design offers great sound isolation. It’s a headphone that you’ll enjoy using for a more confined effect.

The Shure SRH440 has no traces of shoddy workmanship. Its headband are built of sturdy material and padded for comfort. The same applies to the earcups, but comfort level experience may differ. What’s notable is that the ruggedness of the headphone, which means it will survive a nasty fall from your head, except if the impact hits directly at the rather-fragile hinges.

With a detachable cable, you can replace it easily when it has worn out. The cable is terminated with a 3.5mm plug and a 6.3mm adapter is supplied. This rather bulky headphone is not for everyone.

Pros

  • Neutral frequency response.
  • Rugged headband.
  • Detachable cords.

Cons

  • Bulky and heavy earcups.

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14. Presonus HD7

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You can get the Presonus HD7 for a fraction of the price of the best high-end studio monitoring headphones. But being affordable doesn’t mean you’ll have to suffer the lack of quality in the sound and built department.

For most of the sonic range, you’ll get a neutral sound without any enhancement. The only exceptions are the lower and higher frequencies where the amplitude tends to increase. This gives you some powerful low bass and clearer-than-usual high treble. Such a characteristic isn’t unusual for some highly-acclaimed monitoring headphones.

The Presonus HD7 will give you a pleasant sound stage effect, thanks to its semi-open design that expose the drivers. However, you’ll be sacrificing sound-isolation as noises from surrounding can be heard in clarity. Still, it’ll be enjoyable if you’re practicing the guitar in private.

Despite the all-black design, the headphone is punctuated by colorful circular finishes that give it a stylish look. For a total-plastic built, it is surprisingly durable thanks to its flexibility. This also means you won’t have a tough time getting it to fit right onto your ears. A single-sided 8’ 2” cord that stretches from the headphone allows you to connect to the guitar amp easily.

Pros

  • Great sound quality.
  • Comfortable fit for various head sizes.
  • Flat sonic response for most of the frequency range.

Cons

  • The bass can be overpowering.

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15. KRK KNS 6400


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KRK has been synonymous with building great-sounding speakers. It’s only natural to expect the KNS 6400 headphone bears the same superior sound quality. True to its reputation, the headphone has no problems in covering the extended frequency of 10 Hz to 22 kHz with exceptional sonic performance.

The KNS 6400 stays true to its functionality as a monitor headphone. Its flat response along the sonic spectrum means you’ll get all the notes and chords on the guitar reproduced without any enhancement. It’s great for studio works, particularly for monitoring and recording.

You’ll also find the ergonomics of the headphone is just right, particularly if you plan to use it for a long duration. The extra-large padding on the earcups ensures it fits comfortably. There’s also no noticeable excessive pressure as you slip the headphone on. The padding also did a great job of blocking noises.

In terms of durability, KRK did a great job with the KNS 6400. The balance between ruggedness and flexibility is just right. It’ll be long-lasting, as long as you don’t intentionally smash it on the ground. It also sports a detachable cable, which totals up to 8.2 ft. That’s giving you pretty much allowance to connect with a guitar amp.

Pros

  • Flat tonal response for monitoring.
  • Comfortable earpads.
  • Detachable cord.

Cons

  • Some units may have quality issues.

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16. Brainwavz HM5

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The brand Brainwavz may not ring any bells in your mind, but compared to other popular studio monitors, it’s holding its own against the big names. The HM5 stays true to the type of frequency response that’s functional for studio monitors. You can expect a smooth and flat tone across the sonic range.

The absence of heavy bass, soothing treble, and clarity in the midst are what put the HM5 on par with the big boys. Sound quality aside, the headphone is reasonably solid in build. The headband feels solid and the adjustable slider is made of metal. You don’t feel much pressure on the ear with the generous padding on the earcups.

Noise isolation is one of the reasons to get a closed back headphone and the Brainwavz HM5 doesn’t disappoint. You’ll have no external interruption to the tune you’re belting out from the guitar. You’ll also have the bonus of wide soundstage, thanks to the thick cushion on the earcups.

The HM5 is built with a stereo jack for plugging in the removable cords. You’ll have two cords, a 1.3 meter and a 3 meter that ship with the headphone. Generally, it’s an underrated monitor headphone that pairs well with a guitar amplifier.

Pros

  • Flat frequency response for monitoring.
  • Sturdy built with metal slider.
  • Comfortable earcups that prevent ear fatigue.

Cons

  • The plastic part of the headphone may crack.

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Summary

Remember that every headphone is unique on its own and they will give you different experiences when plugged into a guitar amp. Some guitarist prefer monitor-like headphones with flat sonic response while others may take a liking to those with extra-bass.

It’s also important to consider sturdiness and comfort when choosing headphones. While the better ones are usually pricier, those that are highly affordable aren’t all bad. Think about how and where you’ll be playing the guitar before making your choice.

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